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Thigh Injuries

Hamstring strain

Hamstring strains may be caused by a sudden quick movement whilst playing sport or performing exercise. Usually a sharp pain is felt in the hamstring region in the back of the upper leg. Hamstring strains may affect gait pattern causing pain with walking and occasional sudden twinges of pain during activity. Swelling and bruising may be noticeable and usually pressure on the affected area causes pain. Also bending the knee against resistance and difficulty in straightening the knee straighten may be experienced.

You should treat them with PRICE: protection, rest, ice, compression and elevation to reduce pain and swelling and seek advice from a physiotherapist.

Quad strain

Quad strains may also be caused by a sudden quick movement whilst playing sport or performing exercise. Pain with walking may be experienced and exercise may cause moments of pain. There may also be swelling and putting pressure on the injured area may be painful. Straightening the knee against resistance will cause pain and it may be difficult to fully bend the knee.

You should treat them with PRICE: protection, rest, ice, compression and elevation to reduce pain and swelling and seek advice from a physiotherapist.

Dead leg

A dead leg is a common injury in contact sport. It is often caused by a collision, where there is a direct blow to the muscle belly of the quadriceps. There will be pain where there has been impact and often swelling and bruising at the site of the injury. Movement may also be restricted.

You should treat them with PRICE: protection, rest, ice, compression and elevation to reduce pain and swelling and seek advice from a physiotherapist.

Inflammation of the rectus femoris tendon

The front portion of the hip may be painful both during and after training and pressing the muscle at the top will be painful. There will be pain when you lift the knee up or straighten the knee against resistance and a straight leg raise is also likely to cause pain.

You should treat them with PRICE: protection, rest, ice, compression and elevation to reduce pain and swelling and seek advice from a physiotherapist.

Groin strain

Groin strains may be caused by a sudden quick movement and change of direction whilst playing sport or performing exercise. Pain with walking may be experienced and exercise may cause moments of pain. There will be a tightening of the groin muscles, probably the day after initial symptoms are felt and there may be sudden sharp pains in the groin area or adductor muscles. Bruising or swelling may not occur until a couple of days after the initial injury and there may be an inability or difficulty in contracting the adductor muscles (squeezing the legs together or possibly lifting the leg out in front).

For treatment relating to an injury of this type we advise you seek a professional opinion from a qualified physiotherapist.

Gilmore’s groin

This is a common injury seen in the sporting environment. There will be an increase in pain when twisting, sprinting, running and turning. There may be soreness after playing sport and groin pain the day after training / playing when turning or doing twisting movements, for example getting out of a car. Coughing and sneezing may also cause groin pain. In approximately 30% of athletes the injury comes on suddenly but most state that it is a gradual overuse injury.

For treatment relating to an injury of this type we advise you seek a professional opinion from a qualified physiotherapist.

Hernia

A Hernia is also an injury commonly seen in the sporting environment. It is particularly common in football and rugby where the pelvic region is subject to large torsional (twisting) loads. The symptoms are pain in the groin when you exercise or even cough and sneeze, and may be experienced when the legs are squeezed together. An Inguinal Hernia refers to a protrusion of the abdominal contents through a weakness in the connective tissue of the Inguinal canal in the groin. Often surgical intervention is required and a progressive rehabilitation programme vital.

For treatment relating to an injury of this type we advise you seek a professional opinion from a qualified physiotherapist.

Osteitis pubis

Often misdiagnosed, this is a problem which presents with similar symptoms to other pathologies. Groin pain when running, doing sit-ups and squatting is felt and may develop gradually, eventually restricting activity levels. Often repetitive kicking may be a cause and may be mistaken for a muscle strain. In bad cases you may walk with a waddling gait.

For treatment relating to an injury of this type we advise you seek a professional opinion from a qualified physiotherapist.

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